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Shaun Young

in Contemporary artists/Reviews

Shaun Young – Movin’

Shaun Young Movin'

Rhythm Bomb Records RBR-5893 [2018]

Movin’ – Things Will Never Be The Same – I Plead The 5th – More Than Any Tongue Can Tell – Baby Stop Your Jivin’ Me – Drink Til I Can’t Feel The Pain – My Heartache’s Been Confirmed – Got It Made – Someday – Set Me Up – When You Do That – Knockout

At last, a brand new album from Shaun Young. Sure, he released some pretty good 7″ in the recent years but they were just appetizers for this main course.

But here it is. A full 12 songs albums featuring 11 originals and one cover (Someday by way of Bobby Vee and the Crickets.). But wait! There’s more! Young is not alone and he didn’t record this album with one but with two bands.

The Texas Blue Dots are Alberto Telo (Colton Turner) on drums, Paolo Bortoloiol on bass, Massimo Gerosa on piano (is there an Italian connection in Austin?) and none other than Young himself on guitar.

The songs on which they play have a strong blues influence (Someday or Got It Made with a nod to Gene Vincent’s Baby Blue in the intro) with a bit of jivin’ jazz (Baby Stop Your Jivin Me) and plain Rock’n’roll (When You Do That.) The later featuring a cracking guitar solo.

The Three Ringers are the other band to back the singer on this album. They are Bobby Trimble (of Fly Rite Trio/Boys fame) on drums, Tjarko (Ronnie Dawson, the Tinstars, Planet Rockers) on guitar and Todd Wulfmeyer (81/2 Souvenirs, Marti Brom) on double bass. The three of them also play in the Modern Don Juan. So, like with the Texas Blue Dots, expect solid musicianship.

The songs on which they play cover the whole spectrum of rockin’ music. Movin has the same tension and menace than the best of Johnny Kidd. Things Will Never Be the Same is pure Rockabilly straight from the fifties. I guess that Willie Lewis would have been proud to release this one on a beautiful 78rpm. I plead the 5th is more on the Honky Tonk side of things and so are Drink Til I Can Feel the Pain and Set Me Up.

On the Buddy Holly influenced “More than Any Tounge Can Tell” Young sings “I know that I’m not Shakespeare”, well if that title wasn’t already given to Hank Williams I would easily call him the Hillbilly Shakespeare. Since the High Noon days, Young has always proven to be a fine lyricist and this album makes no exception. Another fine exemple is the rockin’ My Heartaches Been Confirmed.

Knockout closes the album like every good rockin’ album should do: letting you beg for more.

Both bands give the best and i’d like to mention Mr Wulfmeyer harmonies that are a big part of the mix (I can’t tell you how many time I listened to More than any…) and Young’s production is nothing but perfect.

Go to Rhythm Bomb or your favorite online dealer to grab a copy of this masterpiece right now!

Fred “Virgil” Turgis

Shaun Young - Wiggle Walk
Shaun Young – Wiggle Walk

Shaun Young – Wiggle Walk

Goofin’ Records [2005]
Get It Got It Good – One-Two-Three Carburetors – The Fire Of Love – My Advice – Wiggle Walk – Havin’ More Fun Than The Law Should Allow – I’ve Found What I Was Looking For – When You’re In Love – She’s Got What I Want – Move Around – Nobody But You Babe – Don’t Ask Me Why – The List – Mean Mean Mean – Rocket In My Pocket

Wiggle Walk was recorded at the now legendary Fort Horton studios in Austin, with the Horton Brothers (Billy on the bass, Bobby on the guitar and lap steel), Dave Biller (guitar) and Buck Johnson (drums). Together or separately they played on some of the best records made this last 10 years and this one makes no exceptions to the rule. It’s a KILLLER ! 
I love High Noon (and it’s an understatement, believe me) but the best thing I can say about this record is that it’s not an High Noon album with other musicians and drums. Well you still have that Buddy Holly feel (Notably on Billy Fury’s My Advice and Bobby Vee and the Cricket’s When you’re in love), but also some Elvis with the brilliant I’ve found what I’ve looking for you could easily find on an Elvis RCA album (The Lowells playing the part of the Jordanaires) and Mean Mean Mean more reminiscent of the Sun days (with a feel similar to I forgot to remember to forget).
Among the covers figures Little Walter’s Nobody but you Baby. Man, this boy can sing the blues too (did you ever doubt ?) and with the help of guest Nick Curran on drums and guitar you’ve got one of the many highlights of the album. Just after this scorchy blues follows the great Don’t ask me why with backup vocal provided (I guess) by the Horton Brothers. And then another change of style with The List, a great rockin’ and boppin’ song. This 37 minute album (at last something I can reproach) ends with  Rocket in My Pocket where the talent of guest piano player T Bonta shines throughout.

Fred “Virgil” Turgis

Shaun Young – Red Hot Daddy

Shaun Young - Red Hot Daddy
Shaun Young – Red Hot Daddy

Goofin GRCG 6062 [1997]
Red Hot Daddy ~ She Still Loves Me ~ If I Can’t Be Your Lover ~ What’s The Deal Jack? ~ High Voltage ~ Phantom Rock ‘n’ Roll ~ Hey Flat Get It ~ I’m Slippin’ In ~ The End Is Near ~ How Can I Turn Her Away ~ Beg Steal & Borrow ~ Foolish Pride ~ Right Here, Right Now and Forever ~ Rickety Shack

Between two High Noon albums, and after his debut 10”, Shaun Young, lead singer of High Noon, took some time to record his first full length featuring 12 originals and two covers (High Voltage and I’m Slippin’ In).
It was recorded in two sessions with two different bands. One took place in Helsinki in Finland with the Barnshakers for backing band, during which they cut Red Hot Daddy, High Voltage and Ricketty Shack. On this three tracks the sound is more Rock’n’roll than Rockabilly with the addition of a saxophone and a piano on Jano’s High Voltage.
The remaining songs were recorded in Shaun’s studio in Austin with Kevin Smith (string bass), Chris Miller (steel), Dereck Peterson (lead guitar), Tjarko Jeen (lead guitar) and Lisa Pankratz sharing the drums duties with Young. The core of this recording is made of Texas rockabilly quite similar to High Noon in style and quality but there are some subtle differences. For exemple She Still Loves Me evokes Gene Vincent’s Catman, If I Can’t Be Your Lover (I Don’t Want to be your Friend) is a superb honky tonk in the style of Hank Williams. Another honky tonk, but with an early Buddy Holly feel in it is How Can I Turn Her Away. Young also makes good use Miller’s steel guitar to achieve spooky effects on Phantom of Rock’nRoll. But the best song, by far, is Beg Steal and Borrow featuring Dave Bedrich on trumpet (from the Big Town Swingtet) who gives to the song a full Texas swing sound.
Superb album from start to finish.

Shaun Young – Our Last Night / Heartache Heartbreak

Shaun Young - Our Last Night
Shaun Young – Our Last Night

Goofin Records GOOFY 543 [1993]

Debut solo single from High Noon frontman. Excellent Texas rockabilly with that Buddy Holly feel.

Ravenna and the Magnetics

in Contemporary artists/R/Reviews

The Magnetics – Rockabilly Fools

the magnetics rockabilly fools

Rollin’Rock LP-025 [1980]
Bound To The Sound – Rockabilly Fool – Waterproof Love – I Like Your Kinda Love – Hypnotized – Headaches & Heartaches – Rock Around With Ollie Vee – Bang Bang – Willin’ & Ready – Good Love – Hot Pink Cowboy Boots – Changing All Those Changes – I Need Your Love – Swamp Sally

The Magnetics – Mean Mean Man

Rollin’ Rock 45-050 / RoundeletROUND 1001

Mean Little Mama / Mean Mean Man

Mean little 7″ indeed.
A side, sung by Jeff Poskin and is a cover of Roy Orbison’s Mean Little Mama . It’s a wild piece of Rockabilly.
B side is a cover of Wanda Jackson’s Mean Mean Man sung by Ravenna. It features a superb guitar solo that rocks like no tommorow.

Ravenna and the Magnetics – Tennesse & Texas

Rollin Rock /Rondelet ABOUT 1008 [1981]
Tennessee & Texas – Find My Baby for Me – The Turning Tide – Surefire Shaker – Lonely Weekends – Waitin’ To Come Back – I Never Lie – Nite Owl – Feel So Good – Baby That’s All Right – 6918 Peach – Vibrate

Ravenna & the Magnetics - partRavenna and the Magnetics – Rockabilly Fools / Tennessee & Texas

Part-CD-691.001
Bound To The Sound – Rockabilly Fool – Waterproof Love – I Like Your Kinda Love – Hypnotized – Headaches & Heartaches – Rock Around With Ollie Vee – Bang Bang – Willin’ & Ready – Good Love – Hot Pink Cowboy Boots – Changing All Those Changes – I Need Your Love – Swamp Sally – Tennessee & Texas – Find My Baby for Me – The Turning Tide – Surefire Shaker – Lonely Weekends – Waitin’ To Come Back – I Never Lie – Nite Owl – Feel So Good – Baby That’s All Right – 6918 Peach – Vibrate

Very good idea from part to reissue on one cd this two album by Ravenna and the Magnetics. Too often overlooked and neglicted in modern rockabilly history. Ravenna and the Magnetics formed in the late 70’s and disbanded in late 1982. The first 14 tracks represent the bands’ debut album recorded at Rockin’ Ronny Weiser’s studio. At the time they went under the name of the Magnetics and were a tight rockabilly combo with Ravenna (aka Freda Johnson) on vocals, Tom Bergham on guitar, Jeff Poskin on second lead guitar and vocals, Steve Grindle on slap bass and Tom Svornich on drums. Both Ravenna and Poskin sang lead sharing the vocals duties equally and writing the stuff they sang, with occasionnal help from Bergham and Grindle. This brings a great variety to the album. Ravenna has a strong voice, in the style of Sparkle Moore and Janis Martin. One can also hear the influences of Carl Perkins, Buddy Holly (covered twice with Rock Around With Ollie Vee and Changing All Those Changes) with a contemporary twist.
After a few line-up changes, Ravenna and the Magnetics recorded Tennessee & Texas. They had lost Poskin who left to form the 88’s but added a saxophone and a piano. As a result Ravenna sang lead throughout and the sound of the band morphed from straight rockabilly to piano led rock’n’roll, most of the original being written by pianist Richard Hogan. Two songs taken from a single complete the set.
Retrospectively it’s hard to imagine that in the wake of the Rockabilly boom initiated by the Stray Cats they didn’t have more exposure. They could easily have national chart success. Maybe they were too raw at places and Rollin Rock’s distribution probably couldn’t handle a national distribution (that’s why the Blasters moved from Rollin Rock to Slash). On a sad footprint to the band’s history, Ravenna passed away in 1997, at the very young age of 42). It’s good to see that her talent is now available to a brand new generation of young Rockabilly fans who will enjoy the Magnetics’ music and perpetuate her legacy. The cd comes with a thick booklets featuring the original liner notes written by Ronny Weiser, a band bio by Tom Bergham, a detailed discography and additionial infos from Bernd Holzapfel and Paul Diffin (Sugar Ray Ford, Blue Cats) who played with the band during their European tour (many rare photos included too).
Get yourself this piece of Rockabilly history.

Fred “Virgil” Turgis

Ravenna & the Magnetics

Three Blue Teardrops

in Contemporary artists/Reviews

Three Blue Teardrops – Ballin’ Jack/Morbid Teenage Love Song

Three Blue Teardrops

Swelltune Records SR45-004 [2018]

At last some new music by Three Blue Teardrops!

Dave Sisson, Randy Sabo and Rick Uppling are back with a brand new single recorded at Hi-Style studios.

Side A is a hot jiver that benefits of the addition of a saxophone and features a mean and superb solo.

B-side is even better. Imagine a sad rockabilly ballad with female backing vocals produced by Shadow Morton. I was almost expecting to hear car crash sound effects in the middle of the song.

Buy it at Swelltune records.

Fred “Virgil” Turgis

Three Blue Teardrops - Rustbelt Trio
Three Blue Teardrops – Rustbelt Trio

Three Blue Teardrops – Rustbelt Trio


A-OK – Shocked – Lincoln ’59 – Alone At Last – Headin’ For Disaster – American Way – Hard-Boiled – Little Lovely – Lord Send Me An Angel – Damage Control – The Dead Know Nothing – I still Dream Of You – I’m Still Standin’ Here
The fourth album relased by Three Blue Teardrops, more than 10 years after their debut release ‘One Part Fist” on the legendary British label Nervous Records. I’m a huge fan of Alan Wilson’s work as a musician (The Sharks) or as a producer (Frantic Flintstones, Gazmen, Colbert Hamilton…) but I was a little disappointed by his production on “One Part Fist”. I think he tried to give some kind of English psychobilly sound to a 100% American band which didn’t really fit them. The two following albums are now very hard to find but are more reflective of what their true sound is. So is “Rustbelt Trio” produced and released by the band. Here you have a real wild rocking and stomping modern rockabilly album made of 13 songs (all band’s originals, half written by guitarist Dave Sisson and the other half by upright bassist Rick Uppling). One of their best quality is to be able to mix genres, adding traditional vocals harmonies on heavy rockers, or enhance what could be a classic hot rod song (Lincoln 49) with a fine and swing drumbeat. Harmonies and superb brushed snare can also be found on “Alone At Last”, a teenagers’ song with a modern edge. The sound hardens a bit on “Headin’ For Disaster”, which talks about alcoholism and self destruct (Stayin’ out late at the beer joints, poppin’ pills and livin’ hard / Drivin’ too fast on the highway, slow at work and feelin’ tired / You’re lookin’ older everyday you spend gettin’ bent / But pretty soon this gift you got is going to be spent). “American Way” is a true heavy rockabilly or psychobilly (call it whatever you want) song which shouldn’t be out of place in The Quakes repertory. Nice! Changing the mood a bit, “Lord Send Me An Angel” is what you can expect with a title like that, a fine ballad with just the guitar and a very light snare, and once again traditional harmonies on the chorus. And right after this calm and peaceful moment they rush into the wild “Damage Control”. Another change of tempo comes with “The Dead Know Nothing” a western ballad with Mexican trumpets, gunshots and percussions ala Ennio Morricone. An Everly Brothers influence can be heard on “I Still Dream Of You”, and the album ends with “I’m Standin’ Here”, dedicated to Stiff Little Fingers’ Jake Burns, but the message is clear and can apply to Dave, Rick and Randy. It’s very good to see the band back in action, with a all-killer/no-filler album. With the new interest toward psychobilly in the USA, it would be more than justice to find them, who were among the first with The Quakes to play that music in America, achieving the same level of success The Reverend Horton Heat did.
Fred “Virgil” Turgis

Lil Red and the Doghouse Trio

in Contemporary artists/Reviews


Lil’ Red and the Doghouse Trio – Dirty Word

Red Wolf Records 1001

Lil Red

Dirty Word – Let’s Elope Baby – I’ve Had My Fill – Gonna Be Loved – Stop Look & Listen – My Little Baby – Black Snake Boots – Ain’t Gonna Stand For This No More – No Good Lover – Surly & Grouchy – Gotta Lotta Rhythm In My Soul – Guitar Picker – Stop Whistling Wolf – Finger Prints

Lil’ Red/Diane Urquhart is a new name on the scene, but her musicians surely are not. You may know Rusti Steel (guitar/steel guitar) and Stuart Dale (doghouse bass) from Rusti Steel and the Tin Tax. And that’s a reference solid enough for me. Lil’ Red plays a clean type of rockabilly, with a huge influence from Janis Martin and a bit of hillbilly, and even if her voice lacks of insurance every so often, the global result is pretty pleasant partly due to the strong musicianship of the band. She proves her dedication to this music by writing six of the fourteen songs of this album, including the best cut here, the threatening “Black Snake Boots” a rocker with sax and a bit of “Bertha Lou” feel in it. The rest comes from the catalogs of Janis Martin, Patsy Cline, Rose Maddox, Mickey and Sylvia (Rusti gsings duet on “No Good Lover”).

Fred “Virgil” Turgis

Josie Kreuzer

in Interviews/Stories

Josie Kreuzer

Josie Kreuzer
Josie Kreuzer

Josie Kreuzer appeared on the rock’n’roll scene around 1992 with the all female rockabilly band Whistle Bait. They soon estabished a name as a solid live act. Sadly, Whistle Bait never released anything (but they recorded some tunes with Wally Hersom at his Wallyphonic studios) and eventually broke up in 1996. Josie then started her own label (She-Devil) and 1997 saw the release of her first solo album “Hot Rod Girl” with Hot Rod Lincoln providing her back-up band. Two years later, she gave us “As Is” a great album with some honky tonk influences, and in 2002 followed “Beggin’ me back” her best record to date and the perfect mix of all her influences. Produced by Mark Neill, with Craig Pacham on drums and Rip Carson on bass, you can’t go wrong with this one.
Note to the reader : this interview has been conducted a few years ago (sometimes between As Is and Beggin’ Me Back) but I thought it was worth publishing as more of the infos are about Josie’s influences and things like that.

by Fred “Virgil” turgis

Can you tell us how you became involved into rockabilly ? Who (or what) was the shock that decided you to become a singer?
Josie Kreuzer I grew up in a very musical household. There seemed to be some kind of music playing most of the time. My mother’s record collection was huge–chock full of blues, jazz and rock n roll. It was hillbilly & rockabilly that struck the strongest chord with me, moved me the most. I started writing songs when I was eleven, really with no intentional goals that I can think of. It wasn’t until I started working at a record store as a teen, that I discovered the more obscure rockabilly music which made me even love it more, and that was when I decided to get a guitar and eventually start a band.
Nowadays what are you influences and what are you listening to ?
My influences are always expanding. They’ve always spanned across many genres of music, not just rockabilly. Lately I’ve been listening to alot of old western swing, mariachi and Hawaiian 78’s, plus a lot of Jazz & vocals like Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald and Kay Starr. I just got back from playing a festival in Australia where I picked up a few CDs from some of the current rockabilly bands out there, so I’ve been listening to those lately as well–The Satellites and The Satellite V are two bands to look out for… really good stuff.

Whistle Bait (Josie Kreuzer, Cleo Ramone, Jennifer Quinn, Teri Tom)
Whistle Bait (Josie Kreuzer, Cleo Ramone, Jennifer Quinn, Teri Tom)

Reading an article about Whistle Bait, it seems you had a wide range of influences (from Wanda Jackson to the Ramones).
Josie Kreuzer Hmm, where’d you find that article ? Yes, if I tried to list all of my influences it would take months and scrolls of paper! I have shelves & shelves of records & CDs and I’m continually buying new stuff all the time.

Could you tell more about this band and how did it sound?
Josie Kreuzer Whistle Bait was my very first band. It was actually all of the members’ first band as well. I started it when I moved to LA in 1992. It was an all-girl rockabilly band, and believe it or not I hadn’t had the intention of starting an all-girl band…it just sort of happened that way. It was a four piece–lead guitar, upright bass,drums & myself on Rhythm guitar & vocals. We were extremely raw sounding –as first bands usually are.

Any chance to see an official release of the demos recorded by Wally Hersom?
Josie Kreuzer That’s a frequently asked question…still, after all of these years… But honestly, I really don’t know if those recordings will ever be released—I can’t foresee putting them out in the near future…. Maybe after I’m dead or something?! I guess I probably shouldn’t mention this, but there are live videos of us too.

Why did Whistle Bait break up?
Josie Kreuzer Mainly because we wanted to go in different directions musically. I wanted to stay traditional rockabilly, I think the others were aiming more towards a harder edge/alternative sound. We also had some disagreements on the business side of things which I won’t go into.

Is it true that it was just before you were due to play Hemsby?
Josie Kreuzer Gosh, you know everything, don’t you ? It’s a classic story. Our last show ever was at The House of Blues in LA on Elvis’ birthday for their annual benefit. Unfortunately we didn’t know it was our last show when we were playing it! Soon after, we had a band meeting or fallout–whatever you want to call it… I had been unhappy for a long time with the music situation, and at that meeting a lot of «certain» business issues came up…we all left pretty pissed off. I decided that it was best if the band didn’t continue… I wasn’t even sure what the hell I was going to do. I had absolutely no plans of doing a solo thing–probably just starting a new band. Whistle Bait had one final gig to do–we were committed, the contract was signed, it was Hemsby 16. Unfortunately the rest of the girls refused to follow through on the booking commitment. I told them that we should at least do this last gig, but they wouldn’t budge (cause they were still angry with my decision to quit the band)… so I called the promoter of Hemsby and told him that the band broke up, but if he wanted, I would still come over and do the show alone. I’ve been a solo artist ever since.

Your first album is straight (and first class) rockabilly. On the second we can hear a touch of country with the presence of the steel. Does it something you did consciously ? Would you like to go more in that style (with fiddle etc.)?
Josie Kreuzer Now that I look back, I realize «As is» was just myself coming full circle. In my earlier years, I was really more hillbilly sounding, but no one really knows this because the first recording that everyone has heard is ‘Hot Rod Girl’… I never «consciously» plan the songs I write, they just come out. «As Is» was just a product of the songs that came out of me at that period of my life. You see, for me, I can’t just sit down and say «well gee, I think. I’m gonna write a rockabilly song today’, my songwriting goes much deeper than that….it’s influenced by what’s going on around me. The arrangements (e.g. steel guitar) just come to fruition as I get together with my band. I happened to have a steel player there at the time, and I just liked the way it sounded. I have a hard time with genres. Unfortunately they have to categorize us somehow. I really just play the music that is deep in my heart, and that just so happens to be categorized by people as rockabilly…so when I slightly stray from that it worries some people–I don’t know why–hillbilly rockabilly–honky–tonk–whatever you want to call it–it all has soul, and that’s what I like creating—music with soul.

Josie kreuzer - Beggin' Me Back
Josie kreuzer – Beggin’ Me Back

Being a rockabilly artist is surely not easy, I guess. But is it more difficult to be a woman on that scene?
Josie Kreuzer It’s both– Working with a band, club bookers and sound guys is more difficult in that males tend to hate being told what to do by a woman..in the end we are always considered a ‘bitch’ where as if I were a man, I’d be considered assertive and be respected to a greater extent. But it’s also easier being a woman in that we have higher recognition on the scene because there aren’t as many doing it. So, lot’s more press and photo ops!

You produce your records and you run your own label. Is it to have more control over your recordings ?
Josie Kreuzer It’s entirely to have total control over my recordings. I have total accountability for everything. I know exactly how much and where every last cent is going from my CD sales earnings. Ask any artist who is with an Indie label, and they probably haven’t even seen $10,000 bucks so far…. and if they have, they are probably wondering if they’ll ever get anything else. Ask any artist who is on a major label and they probably haven’t even seen one penny because they are still paying off their massive debt to the label. It’s sad but true.

Would you like to produce other artists on She-Devil ?
Josie Kreuzer I don’t think I would ever have enough time! Plus I don’t think I’d like to be responsible for other band’s income… Too much of a pain and too much work!

Did you play with rockabilly singer of the first generation as Wanda Jackson or Janis Martin ?
Josie Kreuzer Oh yes, I’ve played with Wanda before – she is still just as rockin as ever – and what a voice?!

Whistlebait (Josie Kreuzer)

in Profiles/Stories
Whistle Bait (Josie Kreuzer, Cleo Ramone, Jennifer Quinn, Teri Tom)
Whistle Bait (Josie Kreuzer, Cleo Ramone, Jennifer Quinn, Teri Tom)

Whistlebait formed soon after Josie Kreuzer (vocals and rhythm guitar) moved from Buffalo to Los Angeles in 1992. A couple of months later,  she met guitar player Teri Tom through an ad in a local newspaper and both of them then recruited double bassist Jennifer Quinn and their first drummer, a guy called Scott soon replaced by Cleo Ramone. Within a year she left and Elaine Ferraro took her place behind the drums. It was their first band. Their lead singer remembers “We were extremely raw sounding –as first bands usually are.”

Their first gig was an opening slot for High Noon and they also opened for Glen Glenn and Lee Rocker.
The band never had any official release though they made two demos, one they weren’t satisfied with and a second one recorded by Wally Hersom (Big Sandy). Talking about this recording and the eventuality to release it Kreuzer joked ” I really don’t know if those recordings will ever be released—I can’t foresee putting them out in the near future…. Maybe after I’m dead or something?!”

In 1996, just after a show at The House of Blues in LA on Elvis’ birthday for their annual benefit Whistlebait disbanded “we wanted to go in different directions musically. I wanted to stay traditional rockabilly, I think the others were aiming more towards a harder edge/alternative sound” explains Kreuzer.
It happened just before the band was scheduled to perform in England at the Hemsby weekender “I told (the rest of the band) that we should at least do this last gig, but they wouldn’t budge (cause they were still angry with my decision to quit the band)… so I called the promoter of Hemsby and told him that the band broke up, but if he wanted, I would still come over and do the show alone. I’ve been a solo artist ever since.” Kreuzer pursued as a solo artist releasing three albums on her own label with Teri Tom appearing on the second one (As Is, 1999).

Whistlebait (second line up): Teri Tom, Jennifer Quinn, Josie Kreuzer and Elaine Ferraro
Whistlebait (second line up): Teri Tom, Jennifer Quinn, Josie Kreuzer and Elaine Ferraro

Josie Kreuzer’s interview here.

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